PHP 5.4.31 Released

POST method uploads

This feature lets people upload both text and binary files. With PHP's authentication and file manipulation functions, you have full control over who is allowed to upload and what is to be done with the file once it has been uploaded.

PHP is capable of receiving file uploads from any RFC-1867 compliant browser.

Note: Related Configurations Note

See also the file_uploads, upload_max_filesize, upload_tmp_dir, post_max_size and max_input_time directives in php.ini

PHP also supports PUT-method file uploads as used by Netscape Composer and W3C's Amaya clients. See the PUT Method Support for more details.

Example #1 File Upload Form

A file upload screen can be built by creating a special form which looks something like this:

<!-- The data encoding type, enctype, MUST be specified as below -->
<form enctype="multipart/form-data" action="__URL__" method="POST">
    <!-- MAX_FILE_SIZE must precede the file input field -->
    <input type="hidden" name="MAX_FILE_SIZE" value="30000" />
    <!-- Name of input element determines name in $_FILES array -->
    Send this file: <input name="userfile" type="file" />
    <input type="submit" value="Send File" />
</form>

The __URL__ in the above example should be replaced, and point to a PHP file.

The MAX_FILE_SIZE hidden field (measured in bytes) must precede the file input field, and its value is the maximum filesize accepted by PHP. This form element should always be used as it saves users the trouble of waiting for a big file being transferred only to find that it was too large and the transfer failed. Keep in mind: fooling this setting on the browser side is quite easy, so never rely on files with a greater size being blocked by this feature. It is merely a convenience feature for users on the client side of the application. The PHP settings (on the server side) for maximum-size, however, cannot be fooled.

Note:

Be sure your file upload form has attribute enctype="multipart/form-data" otherwise the file upload will not work.

The global $_FILES exists as of PHP 4.1.0 (Use $HTTP_POST_FILES instead if using an earlier version). These arrays will contain all the uploaded file information.

The contents of $_FILES from the example form is as follows. Note that this assumes the use of the file upload name userfile, as used in the example script above. This can be any name.

$_FILES['userfile']['name']

The original name of the file on the client machine.

$_FILES['userfile']['type']

The mime type of the file, if the browser provided this information. An example would be "image/gif". This mime type is however not checked on the PHP side and therefore don't take its value for granted.

$_FILES['userfile']['size']

The size, in bytes, of the uploaded file.

$_FILES['userfile']['tmp_name']

The temporary filename of the file in which the uploaded file was stored on the server.

$_FILES['userfile']['error']

The error code associated with this file upload. This element was added in PHP 4.2.0

Files will, by default be stored in the server's default temporary directory, unless another location has been given with the upload_tmp_dir directive in php.ini. The server's default directory can be changed by setting the environment variable TMPDIR in the environment in which PHP runs. Setting it using putenv() from within a PHP script will not work. This environment variable can also be used to make sure that other operations are working on uploaded files, as well.

Example #2 Validating file uploads

See also the function entries for is_uploaded_file() and move_uploaded_file() for further information. The following example will process the file upload that came from a form.

<?php
// In PHP versions earlier than 4.1.0, $HTTP_POST_FILES should be used instead
// of $_FILES.

$uploaddir '/var/www/uploads/';
$uploadfile $uploaddir basename($_FILES['userfile']['name']);

echo 
'<pre>';
if (
move_uploaded_file($_FILES['userfile']['tmp_name'], $uploadfile)) {
    echo 
"File is valid, and was successfully uploaded.\n";
} else {
    echo 
"Possible file upload attack!\n";
}

echo 
'Here is some more debugging info:';
print_r($_FILES);

print 
"</pre>";

?>

The PHP script which receives the uploaded file should implement whatever logic is necessary for determining what should be done with the uploaded file. You can, for example, use the $_FILES['userfile']['size'] variable to throw away any files that are either too small or too big. You could use the $_FILES['userfile']['type'] variable to throw away any files that didn't match a certain type criteria, but use this only as first of a series of checks, because this value is completely under the control of the client and not checked on the PHP side. As of PHP 4.2.0, you could use $_FILES['userfile']['error'] and plan your logic according to the error codes. Whatever the logic, you should either delete the file from the temporary directory or move it elsewhere.

If no file is selected for upload in your form, PHP will return $_FILES['userfile']['size'] as 0, and $_FILES['userfile']['tmp_name'] as none.

The file will be deleted from the temporary directory at the end of the request if it has not been moved away or renamed.

Example #3 Uploading array of files

PHP supports HTML array feature even with files.

<form action="" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data">
<p>Pictures:
<input type="file" name="pictures[]" />
<input type="file" name="pictures[]" />
<input type="file" name="pictures[]" />
<input type="submit" value="Send" />
</p>
</form>
<?php
foreach ($_FILES["pictures"]["error"] as $key => $error) {
    if (
$error == UPLOAD_ERR_OK) {
        
$tmp_name $_FILES["pictures"]["tmp_name"][$key];
        
$name $_FILES["pictures"]["name"][$key];
        
move_uploaded_file($tmp_name"data/$name");
    }
}
?>

File upload progress bar can be implemented using Session Upload Progress.

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User Contributed Notes 10 notes

up
14
daevid at daevid dot com
5 years ago
I think the way an array of attachments works is kind of cumbersome. Usually the PHP guys are right on the money, but this is just counter-intuitive. It should have been more like:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [name] => facepalm.jpg
            [type] => image/jpeg
            [tmp_name] => /tmp/phpn3FmFr
            [error] => 0
            [size] => 15476
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [name] =>
            [type] =>
            [tmp_name] =>
            [error] => 4
            [size] =>
        )
)

and not this
Array
(
    [name] => Array
        (
            [0] => facepalm.jpg
            [1] =>
        )

    [type] => Array
        (
            [0] => image/jpeg
            [1] =>
        )

    [tmp_name] => Array
        (
            [0] => /tmp/phpn3FmFr
            [1] =>
        )

    [error] => Array
        (
            [0] => 0
            [1] => 4
        )

    [size] => Array
        (
            [0] => 15476
            [1] => 0
        )
)

Anyways, here is a fuller example than the sparce one in the documentation above:

<?php
foreach ($_FILES["attachment"]["error"] as $key => $error)
{
      
$tmp_name = $_FILES["attachment"]["tmp_name"][$key];
       if (!
$tmp_name) continue;

      
$name = basename($_FILES["attachment"]["name"][$key]);

    if (
$error == UPLOAD_ERR_OK)
    {
        if (
move_uploaded_file($tmp_name, "/tmp/".$name) )
           
$uploaded_array[] .= "Uploaded file '".$name."'.<br/>\n";
        else
           
$errormsg .= "Could not move uploaded file '".$tmp_name."' to '".$name."'<br/>\n";
    }
    else
$errormsg .= "Upload error. [".$error."] on file '".$name."'<br/>\n";
}
?>
up
5
eslindsey at gmail dot com
5 years ago
Also note that since MAX_FILE_SIZE hidden field is supplied by the browser doing the submitting, it is easily overridden from the clients' side.  You should always perform your own examination and error checking of the file after it reaches you, instead of relying on information submitted by the client.  This includes checks for file size (always check the length of the actual data versus the reported file size) as well as file type (the MIME type submitted by the browser can be inaccurate at best, and intentionally set to an incorrect value at worst).
up
6
michael
4 years ago
Just a little note, when I was trying to get this to work on my webserver I got error telling me the permissions were wrong, I checked and couldn't see anything wrong then I thought to try "./" for my upload directory instead of the full address which was something like "home/username/public_html/uploaddir". This will save it in the same directory as your script for the program above thats something like

<?php
// In PHP versions earlier than 4.1.0, $HTTP_POST_FILES should be used instead
// of $_FILES.

$uploaddir = './';//<----This is all I changed
$uploadfile = $uploaddir . basename($_FILES['userfile']['name']);

echo
'<pre>';
if (
move_uploaded_file($_FILES['userfile']['tmp_name'], $uploadfile)) {
    echo
"File is valid, and was successfully uploaded.\n";
} else {
    echo
"Possible file upload attack!\n";
}

echo
'Here is some more debugging info:';
print_r($_FILES);

print
"</pre>";

?>

I know something trivial but when your new to this, those kind of things elude you.
up
3
Anonymous
1 year ago
Normalizing $_FILES structure:

<?php
    $files
= [];
   
$fix = function (&$files, $values, $prop) use (&$fix) {
        foreach (
$values as $key => $value) {
            if (
is_array($value)) {
               
$fix($files[$key], $value, $prop);
            } else {
               
$files[$key][$prop] = $value;
            }
        }
    };
    foreach (
$_FILES as $name => $props) {
        foreach (
$props as $prop => $value) {
            if (
is_array($value)) {
               
$fix($files[$name], $value, $prop);
            } else {
               
$files[$name][$prop] = $value;
            }
        }
    }
?>
up
1
claude dot pache at gmail dot com
5 years ago
Note that the MAX_FILE_SIZE hidden field is only used by the PHP script which receives the request, as an instruction to reject files larger than the given bound. This field has no significance for the browser, it does not provide a client-side check of the file-size, and it has nothing to do with web standards or browser features.
up
0
gustavo at roskus dot com
2 years ago
Some hosting does not have permission to use the move_uploaded_file function should replace the copy function
up
0
Age Bosma
3 years ago
"If no file is selected for upload in your form, PHP will return $_FILES['userfile']['size'] as 0, and $_FILES['userfile']['tmp_name'] as none."

Note that the situation above is the same when a file exceeding the MAX_FILE_SIZE hidden field is being uploaded. In this case $_FILES['userfile']['size'] is also set to 0, and $_FILES['userfile']['tmp_name'] is also empty. The difference would only be the error code.
Simply checking for these two conditions and assuming no file upload has been attempted is incorrect.

Instead, check if $_FILES['userfile']['name'] is set or not. If it is, a file upload has at least been attempted (a failed attempt or not). If it is not set, no attempt has been made.
up
-2
Mark
3 years ago
$_FILES will be empty if a user attempts to upload a file greater than post_max_size in your php.ini

post_max_size should be >= upload_max_filesize in your php.ini.
up
-2
mail at markuszeller dot com
3 years ago
If you want to increase the upload size, it could make sense to allow it only to a specified directory and not in the php.ini for the whole domain or server. In my case it worked very well placing that into the .htaccess file like this:

php_value    upload_max_filesize    100M
php_value    post_max_size    101M

Remember, post_max_size must be bigger than the upload_max_filesize.
up
-4
zingaburga at hotmail dot com
3 years ago
The documentation is a little unclear about the MAX_FILE_SIZE value sent in the form with multiple file input fields.  The following is what I have found through testing - hopefully it may clarify it for others.

The MAX_FILE_SIZE is applied to each file (not the total size of all files) and to all file inputs which appear after it.  This means that it can be overridden for different file fields.  You can also disable it by sending no number, or sending 0 (probably anything that == '0' if you think about it).

Example:

<form enctype="multipart/form-data" action="." method="POST">
  <!-- no maximum size for userfile0 -->
  <input name="userfile0" type="file" />

  <input type="hidden" name="MAX_FILE_SIZE" value="1000" />
  <!-- maximum size for userfile1 is 1000 bytes -->
  <input name="userfile1" type="file" />
  <!-- maximum size for userfile2 is 1000 bytes -->
  <input name="userfile2" type="file" />

  <input type="hidden" name="MAX_FILE_SIZE" value="2000" />
  <!-- maximum size for userfile3 is 2000 bytes -->
  <input name="userfile3" type="file" />

  <input type="hidden" name="MAX_FILE_SIZE" value="0" />
  <!-- no maximum size for userfile4 -->
  <input name="userfile4" type="file" />
</form>
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